2020-21 Departmental Plan

International Standard Serial Number: 2371-6886

Canadian Grain Commission

The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau
Privy Councillor, Member of Parliament,
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

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From the Minister

The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

I am pleased to present to Parliament and Canadians the Canadian Grain Commission’s 2020-21 Departmental Plan, which describes its key areas of focus, planned results, and associated resource requirements for the next three years.

It is my honour to serve Canada and its hardworking farmers who are the backbone of our economy and rural communities. Our customers in Canada and over two hundred countries are hungry for the safe, high-quality products that we can deliver. By regulating grain handling in Canada and establishing and maintaining science-based standards of quality for Canadian grain, the Canadian Grain Commission supports Canada’s reputation as a consistent and reliable source of high-quality grain.

I am fully committed to ensuring the well-being of farming families and helping our farmers to grow their businesses and contribute to their communities. This includes putting a priority on the participation of more women and youth.

Our government remains committed to comprehensive modernization of the Canada Grain Act, which has not been done since the 1970s. The outcomes have not yet been determined, and we will listen to the grain farmers and stakeholders through an upcoming consultative process. We fully recognize that the strength of Canada’s Grain Quality Assurance System is thanks to the Canadian Grain Commission’s long-standing commitment to investing in scientific research on grain quality and safety.

Grain farmers in Canada have also benefited from our Government’s aggressive diversification of our trade markets, with a target of growing agri-food exports to $75B by 2025. By securing trade deals with our largest trading partners, in North America, Europe, and the Pacific, grain farmers now have preferential access to two thirds of the global market. It is thanks to the hard work of many that, since 2016, Canadian grain exports to the world increased in value by almost 25%. We will continue to stand up for our robust grain inspection system and rules-based trade, while promoting the top quality of our goods through trade missions like the one former Minister Jim Carr led with provincial counterparts to Japan and South Korea last spring.

I am optimistic for the year ahead and look forward to working with the Canadian Grain Commission to ensure Canada’s grain sector remains innovative, prosperous, and dependable. Together, we’ll continue to deliver the clear and tangible results that Canadians deserve.

The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau,
Privy Councillor, Member of Parliament,
Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food

From the Chief Commissioner

Chief Commissioner, Patti Miller

As Chief Commissioner, I’m so proud of the work we do at the Canadian Grain Commission to benefit Canadian grain farmers, the grain sector, and all Canadians. That’s why I am very pleased to share our Departmental Plan for 2020-21 with you. The plan outlines how we will deliver clear results for a dynamic and competitive grain sector, while meeting our mandate under the Canada Grain Act.

In all that we do, we’re guided by our core responsibility to regulate grain handling in Canada and to establish and maintain science-based standards for Canadian grain. Thanks in large part to our work, customers of Canadian grain view Canada’s Grain Quality Assurance System as the best in the world. They trust Canadian grain will consistently meet their evolving needs for quality and safety. When I meet with international customers of Canadian grain, their feedback strongly confirms the vital role the Canadian Grain Commission plays in upholding Canada’s grain quality reputation.

Given the Canadian grain sector is constantly growing and evolving, we continue to have valuable opportunities to rethink and innovate our programs and services and re-invest in the Canadian grain sector. During 2018-19, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada initiated a review of the Canada Grain Act in response to stakeholder input and the Government’s commitment to regulatory review and modernization. The Canadian Grain Commission is providing significant support to Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in this process through evidence-based analysis and advice. At the same time, we continue to modernize our programs and services within our current regulatory framework to ensure they meet the evolving needs of the grain sector.

I am confident that the Canadian Grain Commission will continue to deliver high quality programs and services that benefit the entire grain value chain, from Canadian grain farmers to international grain markets, in 2020-21 and beyond.

Patti Miller
Chief Commissioner
Canadian Grain Commission

Plans at a glance

The Canadian Grain Commission’s Core Responsibility is to regulate grain handling in Canada and to establish and maintain science-based standards for Canadian grain. The Departmental Results of this Core Responsibility are that domestic and international markets regard Canadian grain as dependable and safe and that farmers are fairly compensated for their grain.

The Canadian Grain Commission is committed to working in close collaboration with grain sector stakeholdersFootnote 1, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, central agencies, and other domestic and foreign government entities to deliver on its Core Responsibility and Departmental Results.

The majority of Canadian Grain Commission resources are dedicated to providing effective and sustainable programs and services to deliver upon its mandate and achieve its Departmental Results. However, in recent years, the Canadian Grain Commission has also dedicated resources to strategic initiatives identified within its key areas of focus. The Canadian grain sector has experienced a period of significant transformation, and the Canadian Grain Commission is working to innovate its programs and services to meet the evolving needs of farmers and the grain sector.

While the majority of Canadian Grain Commission’s resources will continue to be dedicated to day-to-day delivery of programs and services to deliver on our mandate, the three key areas of focus that support the Canadian Grain Commission’s Core Responsibility and achievement of its planned results for 2020-21 were identified:

Reviewing the Canadian Grain Commission regulatory framework

During 2018-19, in response to stakeholder input received through the Regulatory Review and the Economic Strategy Roundtable, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada initiated a review of the Canada Grain Act and the Canadian Grain Commission. Budget 2019 confirmed the Government’s commitment to reviewing the Canada Grain Act. Through evidence-based analysis and advice, the Canadian Grain Commission will continue to support Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s review of the Canada Grain Act and support Canadian Grain Commission staff through the regulatory review and modernization process. This provides an opportunity for the department to further innovate programs, services, and the regulatory framework in order to meet the evolving needs of the grain sector and support the Government’s innovation and growth agendas.

Modernizing Canadian Grain Commission programs and services

Modernizing the Canadian Grain Commission to support the continued competitiveness of Canadian grains in both domestic and international markets is a key focus area going forward, and includes the following initiatives: developing a suite of e-services to provide seamless digital service delivery to our clients; building on our science-based approach and developing a strategic vision for grain research; making strategic investments in Canadian Grain Commission facilities, infrastructure and technology to support innovative programs and services; and modernizing the grain grading system to strengthen the quality and dependability of Canadian grain.

Providing technical guidance to mitigate risks to market access for Canadian grain exports

The Canadian Grain Commission will collaborate with Government of Canada partner departments and industry stakeholders to mitigate market access risks for Canadian grain exports and respond to emerging trade issues. Market access risks are seen as arising mainly, though not exclusively, from heightened market sensitivity to actual or perceived food-safety concerns. The Canadian Grain Commission has and will continue to respond to grain and food safety concerns using evidence collected through its export monitoring, analytical testing and research. Further, the Canadian Grain Commission will roll-out the regulatory and operational changes to implement Canada-United States-Mexico-Agreement (if, or when, ratified).

For more information on the Canadian Grain Commission’s plans, priorities and planned results, see the “Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks” section of this report.

Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks

Grain Regulation

Description

The Canadian Grain Commission regulates grain handling in Canada and establishes and maintains science-based standards of quality for Canadian grain.

Planning highlights

The planned results of the Canadian Grain Commission’s Grain Regulation Core Responsibility are that domestic and international markets regard Canadian grain as dependable and safe and that farmers are fairly compensated for their grain. To achieve these results, the following three key areas of focus and initiatives are planned:

Reviewing the Canadian Grain Commission regulatory framework

Key initiatives related to reviewing the Canada Grain Act and Canadian Grain Commission regulatory framework include, but are not limited to:

  • Supporting Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s review of the Canada Grain Act by providing evidence-based analysis and advice. The Canadian Grain Commission has developed a work plan to support Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in the analysis of options. An internal team to support the Canadian Grain Commission’s contributions to the review has also been established, with representation from across the organization. In collaboration with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, the Canadian Grain Commission is conducting an analysis of the existing service delivery model and potential alternative service delivery models for government consideration. Analysis is also underway to look at options for modernizing safeguards for grain farmers to ensure they remain effective in an evolving marketplace.
  • Supporting Canadian Grain Commission staff through the regulatory review and modernization process. To support employees through the change process, the Canadian Grain Commission will focus on transparency in its communications, staff engagement, and ensuring opportunity for input into the analysis across the organization.

Modernizing Canadian Grain Commission programs and services

Modernizing the Canadian Grain Commission to support the continued competitiveness of Canadian grains in both domestic and international markets is a key focus area going forward. The Canadian Grain Commission also continues to look for opportunities to modernize programs and services to better address the evolving needs of farmers. This area of focus includes the following initiatives:

  • Developing a suite of e-services to provide seamless digital service delivery to our clients. This initiative will strengthen technological innovation, including digitizing services in the Safeguards for Grain Farmers and Grain Quality programs, as well as contribute to a seamless and user-friendly online experience. The Canadian Grain Commission is assessing the feasibility of leveraging existing technology in other departments to create an online portal for Canadian Grain Commission clients.
  • Building on our science-based approach and renewing its strategic vision for grain research. As a result of the increased focus on analytical assessment of grain quality, grain sector stakeholders frequently look to the Canadian Grain Commission to certify or evaluate analytical test kits, methods and technologies. The Canadian Grain Commission is renewing its strategic vision for grain research to ensure that its activities further science-based standards for Canadian grain and maintain the reputation of Canada’s Grain Quality Assurance System being among the best in the world.
  • Making strategic investments in Canadian Grain Commission facilities, infrastructure and technology to support innovative programs and services. To address the need for Grain Research Laboratory accommodation renewal, the Canadian Grain Commission is engaged with Public Service and Procurement Canada and the Laboratories Canada initiative to find options and collaboration opportunities with other science-based departments in Winnipeg. The Canadian Grain Commission must also re-invest in terminal elevator upgrades and leased spaces to support innovative programs and services for the grain sector.
  • Modernizing the grain grading system to strengthen the quality and dependability of Canadian grain. The initiative includes an ongoing review of grading factors to ensure they meet the needs of key stakeholders. Since 2017, as part of our commitment to continuous improvement, the Canadian Grain Commission has been reviewing the Canadian grain grading system to ensure that grain is graded using the most effective, precise and user-friendly tools possible. To date, changes to the Official Grain Grading Guide include: aligning the decimal precision of grading factor, adjusting individual tolerances for commercial cleanliness for wheat, and moving to a more precise assessment of frost, heat stress and mildew damage in wheat.

Providing technical guidance to mitigate risks to market access for Canadian grain exports

The initiatives supporting market access include, but are not limited to:

  • Collaborating with stakeholders to mitigate market access risks and respond to emerging trade issues. Importers are becoming more selective and regulators more stringent when it comes to genetically modified grains, maximum residue limits on herbicides and pesticides, and toxin limits for trace elements. Rising concerns over food safety have increased the demand for health risk assessments and investigations. The Canadian Grain Commission continues to work closely with its Government of Canada partners to respond to emerging market access risks and opportunities.
  • Rolling-out the regulatory and operational changes to implement the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement (CUSMA) if, or when, ratified. The required changes to the Canada Grain Act to fulfill Canada’s obligations under CUSMA will only occur if, or when, the Agreement is signed and ratified. At that point, the Canadian Grain Commission will put forward a package of consequential regulatory amendments and make the necessary operational adjustments.

Gender-based analysis plus

Planned results for the Canadian Grain Commission’s Core Responsibility of Grain Regulation do not affect the government-wide priorities of gender equality, diversity and inclusiveness. However, the Canadian Grain Commission contributes to these priorities by incorporating gender-based analysis plus into its employment equity and diversity goals and framework. The Gender-based analysis plus supplementary information table details these initiatives.

United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Although the Canadian Grain Commission is not bound by the Federal Sustainable Development Act and is not required to develop a full departmental sustainable development strategy, the Canadian Grain Commission adheres to the principles of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) by complying with the Policy on Green Procurement. The 2020-21 Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy supplementary information table details these initiatives.

Experimentation
  • In alignment with the federal government’s evidence-based approach to achieve planned results and address problems that traditional approaches have been unable to solve, the Canadian Grain Commission is committed to innovation and experimentation.
  • In collaboration with Pulse Canada, the Canadian Grain Commission is piloting a voluntary export analysis program that will support small-lot exporters of Canadian pulses in meeting regulatory and contractual requirements. Program participants can voluntarily submit samples of pulses to the Canadian Grain Commission, who will then analyze each sample. Participants will be able to view results of each sample submitted by their company via a secure online database. This analysis will allow small-lot exporters to undertake measures to ensure that all export shipments meet regulatory and contractual requirements. Initial plans are for the program to be administered for a two-year period and reviewed annually by the Canadian Grain Commission based on agreed-upon performance indicators and outcomes.
Key risks

The Canadian Grain Commission has identified three key corporate risks and one key corporate opportunity that could affect achieving planned results under its Core Responsibility. These risks are:

  • ensuring Canadian grain is dependable and safe while balancing rapidly evolving grain sector needs;
  • the Canadian Grain Commission’s aging lab infrastructure and facilities; and
  • the capacity to respond to opportunities while delivering upon the core mandate.

To mitigate program risk and ensure long term success in delivering the departmental results, the Canadian Grain Commission’s key corporate opportunity is to continue collaborating with producers, industry stakeholders, Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, and other government departments and agencies.

The Canadian Grain Commission has an Integrated Risk Management Working Group that includes representatives from all programs and sections of the organization. Information and recommendations from this group are integrated into Canadian Grain Commission governance processes for review and action as necessary (e.g. implementation of additional mitigation strategies and/or contingency plans).

Planned results for Grain Regulation
Departmental Results Departmental Result Indicators Target Date to achieve target 2016–17 Actual results 2017-18 Actual results 2018-19 Actual results
Domestic and international markets regard Canadian grain as dependable and safe Percentage of stakeholders who regard Canadian grain as dependable and safe TBDFootnote 2 TBDFootnote 3 Not availableFootnote 4 Not available Not available
Value of Canadian grain exports $30.6 billionFootnote 5 April 2025Footnote 6 $20.2 billionFootnote 7 $21.0 billionFootnote 8 $19.4 billionFootnote 9
Farmers are fairly compensated for their grain Percentage of sales where farmers are compensated for their grain 100% April 2019 100% 100% 100%
Percentage of outstanding liabilities paid to farmers in the event of a default by a Canadian Grain Commission-licensed grain company 100% April 2019 No company defaultsFootnote 10 No company defaults 100%

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Canadian Grain Commission’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned budgetary financial resources for Grain Regulation
2020–21 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2020–21 planned spending 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending
6,348,140 6,348,140 6,407,810 6,445,501

Note: Planned spending is net of respendable revenues.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Canadian Grain Commission’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned human resources for Grain Regulation
2020–20 planned full-time equivalents 2021–22 planned full-time equivalents 2022–23 planned full-time equivalents
329 329 329

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Canadian Grain Commission’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services: planned results

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of Programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct services that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. These services are:

  • Management and Oversight Services
  • Communications Services
  • Legal Services
  • Human Resources Management Services
  • Financial Management Services
  • Information Management Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Real Property Management Services
  • Materiel Management Services
  • Acquisition Management Services

Planning highlights

Through the strategic planning process, the Canadian Grain Commission identified two over-arching priorities that are integral in guiding delivery of its mandate and areas of focus:

  • Strengthening effective communication is a priority that engages both external and internal stakeholders and cuts across all programs, areas of focus and initiatives. Communicating information and progress on the areas of focus is a priority that will engage staff and support delivery of each initiative. Strengthening effective external communication will provide awareness of our mandate and how our programs, and services provide value to grain producers and the grain sector.
  • Investing in our people and delivering on government-wide corporate commitments is a priority that will allow the Canadian Grain Commission to continue to successfully deliver upon its mandate and its areas of focus. Promoting healthy and inclusive workplaces and supporting efforts to address the pay system are government-wide corporate commitments outlined by the Clerk of the Privy Council. Supporting Canadian Grain Commission staff to do their work efficiently and effectively and developing succession plans will be a priority going forward.
Planned budgetary financial resources for Internal Services
2020–21 Main Estimates 2020–21 Planned spending 2021–22 Planned spending 2022–23 Planned spending
245,000 245,000 245,000 245,000

Note: Planned spending is net of respendable revenues.

Planned human resources for Internal Services
2020–21 planned full-time equivalents 2021–22 planned full-time equivalents 2022–23 planned full-time equivalents
121 121 121

Spending and human resources

This section provides an overview of the department’s planned spending and human resources for the next three consecutive fiscal years and compares planned spending for the upcoming year with the current and previous years’ actual spending.

Planned spending

Departmental spending 2017–18 to 2022–23

The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory) spending over time.

Departmental Spending Trend Graph details below
Departmental Spending Trend, text version
Departmental Spending Trend (thousands of dollars)
2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23
Statutory -8,369 -2,992 7,670 1,497 1,517 1,535
Voted 5,405 5,145 4,897 5,096 5,136 5,155
Total -2,964 2,153 12,567 6,593 6,653 6,691

Budgetary planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned spending for each of the Canadian Grain Commission’s core responsibilities and to Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.
Core Responsibility and Internal Services 2017–18 expenditures 2018–19 expenditures 2019–20 forecast spending 2020–21 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2020–21 planned spending 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending
Grain Regulation (21,266,777) (17,564,268) (10,401,936) 6,348,140 6,348,140 6,407,810 6,445,501
Subtotal (21,266,777) (17,564,268) (10,401,936) 6,348,140 6,348,140 6,407,810 6,445,501
Internal Services 18,303,234 19,717,425 22,968,823 245,000 245,000 245,000 245,000
Total (2,963,543) 2,153,157 12,566,887 6,593,140 6,593,140 6,652,810 6,690,501

Canadian Grain Commission revenues are dependent on annual grain volumes that can fluctuate considerably from year-to-year and are not fully known prior to the commencement of the fiscal year. This can result in significant variances between projected and actual revenues. The Canadian Grain Commission could accumulate surpluses in years with higher-than-average grain volumes and may be required to draw on its accumulated surplus funds in years with lower-than-average volumes.

The 2013-2018 fee and revenue projections were based on a funding model that used a historical average grain volume to forecast revenue projections. However, the actual volume of grain inspected and weighed were underestimated due to an unprecedented increase in production. This led to an accumulated surplus of $130.677 million as of March 31, 2018.

As a response, the Canadian Grain Commission implemented a new model for forecasting annual grain volumes and revenue projections that uses an updated time-series analysis model. The Canadian Grain Commission anticipates that the updated model will mitigate the risk of significant accumulation of additional surplus in its revolving fund. Further, the Canadian Grain Commission updated fees for April 1, 2018 as published in 2017 User Fees Consultation and Pre-Proposal Notification to better align revenues and costs, and to factor in projected increases in grain volumes inspected and weighed by the Canadian Grain Commission. The Canadian Grain Commission expects that these fee reductions will result in sector savings of approximately $15.5 million annually.

On August 1, 2018, the Canadian Grain Commission announced a framework to address the accumulated surplus of $130.677 million. The Investment Framework proposes to retain $40 million for a contingency operating reserve to guard against the possibility of future declines in grain volumes, while allowing for strategic investment of $90 million in three key areas:

  • Strengthening safeguards for producers
  • Investing in grain quality assurance
  • Enhancing grain quality science and innovation

As part of the Investment Framework, the Canadian Grain Commission announced enhancements to the Harvest Sample Program (HSP). Starting in the 2018-19 crop year, the HSP now provides deoxynivalenol (DON) and Falling Number results for wheat samples and DON results for corn samples. This enhancement is the first initiative funded through the Canadian Grain Commission’s Investment Framework and will be funded for a minimum of five years. Producers can use this quality information to help make marketing and delivery decisions. The Canadian Grain Commission has allocated $4 million to fund these enhancements to the HSP for five years.

The Canadian Grain Commission will consider investment initiatives going forward within the broader context of Canada Grain Act review and benefits to the entire value chain.

Fiscal year 2019-20 spending is forecasted to be higher primarily due to the carry over of budget items from 2018-19 to 2019-20, spending according to the Investment Framework.

2020–21 Budgetary planned gross spending summary (dollars)

The following table reconciles gross planned spending with net planned spending for 2020–21.
Core Responsibility and Internal Services 2020–21 Planned gross spending 2020–21 Planned revenues netted against expenditures 2020–21 Planned net spending
Grain Regulation 44,928,772 38,580,632 6,348,140
Subtotal 44,928,772 38,580,632 6,348,140
Internal Services 21,215,236 20,970,236 245,000
Total 66,144,008 59,550,868 6,593,140

The Canadian Grain Commission’s revenue projections for 2020-21 and beyond are based on the fees as set out in Schedule I to the Canada Grain Regulations. This includes annual grain volume projections of 34.405 million metric tonnes. Beginning in 2019-20, all Canadian Grain Commission fees will adjust annually for inflation on April 1 to be consistent with the new Service Fees Act (SFA). The 2020-21 adjustment is based on the April All-Items Consumer Index for Canada of 2.0 percent. This annual increase limits the need for fee amendments going forward. Current fee amounts are located on the Canadian Grain Commission website.

Planned net spending and planned gross spending for 2020-21 includes additional investment for enhancements to the HSP, in accordance with the Investment Framework.

Planned human resources

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned full-time equivalents (FTEs) for the core responsibility in Canadian Grain Commission’s departmental results framework and to Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Human resources planning summary for Core Responsibility and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Core Responsibility and Internal Services 2017–18 actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 actual full-time equivalents 2019-20 forecast full-time equivalents 2020-21 planned full time equivalents 2021-22 planned full time equivalents 2022-23 planned full time equivalents
Grain Regulation 326 325 325 329 329 329
Subtotal 326 325 325 329 329 329
Internal Services 117 118 129 121 121 121
Total 443 443 444 450 450 450

The Canadian Grain Commission reorganized to add additional resources, within the current fee framework, to support investing in technology and equipment to support innovation, enhancing the Grain Research Laboratory’s Harvest Sample Program and grain safety research, and addressing pay issues arising from the Phoenix pay system. Forecasted full-time equivalents for 2020-21 is 450.

Estimates by vote

Information on the Canadian Grain Commission’s organizational appropriations is available in the 2020–21 Main Estimates.

Condensed future-oriented statement of operations

The condensed future oriented statement of operations provides an overview of the Canadian Grain Commission’s operations for 2019–20 to 2020–21.

The amounts for forecast and planned results in this statement of operations were prepared on an accrual basis. The amounts for forecast and planned spending presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan were prepared on an expenditure basis. Amounts may therefore differ.

A more detailed future oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the Canadian Grain Commission’s website.

Condensed future oriented statement of operations for the year ending March 31, 2021 (dollars)
Financial information 2019–20 Forecast results 2020–21 Planned results Difference (2020–21 Planned results minus 2019–20 Forecast results)
Total expenses 68,932,405 66,272,067 (2,660,338)
Total revenues 58,732,857 59,550,868 818,011
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 10,199,548 6,721,199 (3,478,349)

The 2020-21 net cost of operations before government funding is projected to be $6.721 million, a net difference of $3.478 million.

Total expenses

2020-21 total expenses are planned to be $66.272 million, a decrease of $2.660 million over the 2019-20 forecasted expenditures of $68.932 million. This is primarily due to carry over of budget items from 2018-19 to 2019-20.

Total revenues

Based on the Canadian Grain Commission’s annual grain forecasting model, 2020-21 total revenues are forecast to be $59.551 million, an increase of $0.818 million over the 2019-20 forecasted revenues of $58.733 million. This is primarily due to lower utilization of optional services in 2019-20 than projected in 2020-21.

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau

Institutional head: Patti Miller

Ministerial portfolio: Agriculture and Agri-Food

Enabling instrument: Canada Grain Act

Year of incorporation/commencement: 1912

Other: The Canadian Grain Commission’s head office is located in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The Canadian Grain Commission operates two regional offices and eight service centres, and provides service at more than 30 terminal elevator service delivery points across Canada. A combination of revolving fund (fees) and appropriation sources fund Canadian Grain Commission programs and services. The Canadian Grain Commission plans to recover approximately 92 percent of its costs through fees and approximately eight percent through appropriation.

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

“Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on the Canadian Grain Commission’s website on the “About us” page.

Operating context

Information on the operating context is available on the Canadian Grain Commission’s website.

Reporting framework

The Canadian Grain Commission approved Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory for 2020–21 are as follows:

Graphical presentation of Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory
Departmental Results Framework Core Responsibility: Grain Regulation Internal Services
Departmental Result: Domestic and international markets regard Canadian grain as dependable and safe Indicator: Percentage of stakeholders who regard Canadian grain as dependable and safe
Indicator: Value of Canadian grain exports
Departmental Result: Farmers are fairly compensated for their grain Indicator: Percentage of sales where farmers are compensated for their grain
Indicator: Percentage of outstanding liabilities paid to farmers in the event of a default by a Canadian Grain Commission licensed grain company
Program Inventory Program: Grain Quality
Program: Grain Research
Program: Safeguards for Grain Farmers

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to the Canadian Grain Commission’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the Canadian Grain Commission’s website on Corporate Reports/Departmental Plan page:

Federal tax expenditures

The Canadian Grain Commission’s Departmental Plan does not include information on tax expenditures that relate to its planned results for 2020–21.

Tax expenditures are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance, and the Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for government¬ wide tax expenditures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report provides detailed information on tax expenditures, including objectives, historical background and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis. The tax measures presented in this report are solely the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Canadian Grain Commission
600-303 Main Street
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 3G8

Telephone: 204-984-0506

Toll free: 1-800-853-6705

Facsimile: 204-983-2751

Teletypewriter (TTY, toll free): 1-866-317-4289

Email: contact@grainscanada.gc.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation
(crédit): Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures
(dépenses budgétaires): Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
core Responsibility
(responsabilité essentielle): An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan
(Plan ministériel): A report on the plans and expected performance of a department over a 3 year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
departmental priority
(priorité ministérielle): A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Departmental priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.
departmental result
(résultat ministériel): A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
departmental result indicator
(indicateur de résultat ministériel): A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a departmental result.
departmental results framework
(cadre ministériel des résultats): A framework that consists of the department’s core responsibilities, departmental results and departmental result indicators.
Departmental Results Report
(Rapport sur les résultats ministériels): A report on a department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation
(expérimentation): The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare, the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works and what doesn’t. Experimentation is related to, but distinct form innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.
full time equivalent
(équivalent temps plein): A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)
(analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+]): An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities
(priorités pangouvernementales): For the purpose of the 2020–21 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2019 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiatives
(initiative horizontale): An initiative in which two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non budgetary expenditures
(dépenses non budgétaires): Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance
(rendement): What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator
(indicateur de rendement): A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting
(production de rapports sur le rendement): The process of communicating evidence based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision-making, accountability and transparency.
plan
(plan): The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending
(dépenses prévues): For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
program
(programme): Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
program Inventory
(répertoire des Programmes): Identifies all of the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s core responsibilities and results.
results
(résultat): An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
strategic outcome
(résultat stratégique): A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
target
(cible): A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures
(dépenses votées): Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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